Spork Boards

iBox (the hardware)

Cloudscout's Avatar Picture Cloudscout – January 14, 2008 03:08PM Reply Quote
iBox
Box mini
Box Pro
BoxBook
BoxBook Pro

The more the boxes change, the more they stay the same... or don't.

(talk about the hardware here)

John Willoughby – July 19, 2018 05:58PM Reply Quote
Cyberdyne Systems Customer Support
Maybe this is their "See, we told you that you didn't want a performance laptop" device.

ARL (Moderator) – July 19, 2018 07:13PM Reply Quote
I whinge therefore I am!
I think that's the problem with my 2015 MBP, the i7 in it just wasn't remotely being properly cooled. It regularly went over 90˚C

If only Apple told me I needed to use it in a freezer!

El Jeffe – July 20, 2018 06:57AM Reply Quote
What a journey.
Why doesn't someone just/merely 3D-print a new main/bottom that someone can just plop the "too thin and cramped" parts into?
Adding extra 1/3 inch should do wonders for airflow, imo.

johnny k – July 21, 2018 01:37PM Reply Quote
"Just"?

El Jeffe – July 21, 2018 08:27PM Reply Quote
What a journey.
or alternatively, "merely" . :)

John Willoughby – July 24, 2018 10:03AM Reply Quote
Cyberdyne Systems Customer Support
While discussing a work-around for the extreme throttling seen in the new MacBook Pro, a user also identifies what appears to be bad engineering on Apple's part (as well as the limitations of the current design). [EDIT] TL;DR Apple used a voltage regulator from the previous generation of MacBook Pro with settings that are inappropriate for the new CPU.


In my opinion, Apple seriously screwed up here. The testing that I did was easily within Apple's capabilities, and it is highly irresponsible of them to ship these machines out this way. As far as I am aware, the MSR is set to the intel's default ... and clearly Intel expects that if you are going to use this default, you will have a machine capable of delivering 100 Watts of power steady state. Intel does not expect that you must have thermal capabilities of shedding those 100 Watts, as the chip will thermally throttle if it reaches TJunction (100C), and that thermal throttling would not be nearly as painful as this type of VRM throttling. Most likely, if Apple wanted to handle things that way, they could have figured out a way to attach the heatpipe to the VRM. Even if they did not want to handle things that way, they should have reduced the MSR value from the factory to something that the VRM is actually capable of delivering (ie: My settings).

The good news is that these settings increase the performance by at least 20% (and possibly much more depending on the workload), and Apple can adjust this setting (or handle the VRM overload using other power management logic). Even if Apple doesn't, you as a consumer can do this yourself.

The bad news is that it's clear that this i9 chip can probably do signifigantly better if it were driven with a better VRM (and had adequate cooling as well), and could probably get 20-25% faster speeds than with my settings if the power system were up to task. There is no way that Apple can get that additional gain with the current hardware design, short of a recall to change out the heatsink to something that cooled the VRMs, and replace the thermal paste with something like Liquid Metal. It's pretty clear that there is no additional space for bigger fans, so apple's options here are very limited.




Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 07/24/2018 10:05AM by John Willoughby.

johnny k – July 24, 2018 10:44AM Reply Quote
So this is only a problem with the new i9 option? There's enough thermal overhead for the other CPUs? Still don't think I can bring myself to get a new MBP with soldered memory and storage, but it's otherwise starting to look up again.

John Willoughby – July 24, 2018 11:56AM Reply Quote
Cyberdyne Systems Customer Support
Quote
johnny k
So this is only a problem with the new i9 option? There's enough thermal overhead for the other CPUs?

That's my (limited) understanding. I haven't gone deep on this, as I have no plans to get one.

John Willoughby – July 24, 2018 01:27PM Reply Quote
Cyberdyne Systems Customer Support
Apple said that they've fixed throttling issues in the new MBP.

Following extensive performance testing under numerous workloads, we've identified that there is a missing digital key in the firmware that impacts the thermal management system and could drive clock speeds down under heavy thermal loads on the new MacBook Pro. A bug fix is included in today's macOS High Sierra 10.13.6 Supplemental Update and is recommended. We apologize to any customer who has experienced less than optimal performance on their new systems. Customers can expect the new 15-inch MacBook Pro to be up to 70% faster, and the 13-inch MacBook Pro with Touch Bar to be up to 2X faster, as shown in the performance results on our website.

Mokers (Moderator) – July 24, 2018 02:27PM Reply Quote
Formerly Remy Martin
So, not bad engineering, but shitty QA! Much better...

John Willoughby – July 24, 2018 04:28PM Reply Quote
Cyberdyne Systems Customer Support

bahamut – July 25, 2018 03:35PM Reply Quote
New David Lee review.

I was impressed by his previous review and this one hasn't changed my opinion of the guy. I think we've found our new Walt Mossberg.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UTguywiC9aw

El Jeffe – July 25, 2018 05:36PM Reply Quote
What a journey.
clicked thinking I'd see Van Halen singer. :|

Mokers (Moderator) – July 25, 2018 10:17PM Reply Quote
Formerly Remy Martin
He’s very fair with his reviews. Doesn’t seem Ike he is trying to clickbait his way through things.

ddt – July 26, 2018 07:00PM Reply Quote
Kids today... really present well. It's impressive.

ddt

El Jeffe – July 27, 2018 05:34AM Reply Quote
What a journey.
elocution, I take?
Attire aka presentation, much lacking. I prefer nice pressed shirts, and blazers in the least. :)

John Willoughby – August 04, 2018 04:38PM Reply Quote
Cyberdyne Systems Customer Support
Oops.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 08/04/2018 04:40PM by John Willoughby.

Sorry, only registered users may post in this forum.

Click here to login