Spork Boards

AAPL.O

tomierna's Avatar Picture tomierna (Admin) – December 08, 2007 02:37AM Reply Quote
Talk about industry stock market mumbo-jumbo here.

Mokers (Moderator) – January 23, 2008 02:54AM Reply Quote
Formerly Remy Martin
http://www.macedition.com/2008/01/22/steve-jobs-not-a-petting-zoo

Quote

As for AAPL itself, it may be getting hammered harder than the other Violet Blue, but if people haven’t noticed, the market as a whole has been taking it on the chin for a little while now. AAPL may be 20% off it’s all time high, but as the market prepares for a correction, recession, etc, Apple appears to be in a good position for continued profits, so we’ll wait to get our panties in a bunch for a little while longer.

Expected profits off fifteen cents a share and expected revenue falls short by about 3% of what was expected and the stock takes a tumble? And it's not like Apple is predicting flat sales. They said they expected sales growth of 29%! That's great growth, but apparently not worthy enough.

Cloudscout, you have valid points about the iPhone, but Apple only sells one model and has been in the phone business for a little over half a year. People are already starting to copy them and so they must do something right. I feel bad that you can't buy an Apple phone, but I don't think Apple's forecast of ten million handsets counted on 8 million of them being used by people who need exchange. BTW, there are a lot of places that use exchange on the desktop, but don't support them on the smart phones because you have to send your password to RIM unless you bought your own server. And since the iPhone has a real browser, OWA makes the exchange experience as good or better than a lot of the smart phones anyway.

Cloudscout – January 23, 2008 03:09AM Reply Quote
Det finnes ikke dårlig vær, bare dårlige klær!
I don't understand what you mean by the last two sentences.

If you have an Exchange server, you don't need to involve RIM at all. OWA on the iPhone is... not good.

Windows Mobile devices have a good thing going with Exchange ActiveSync. You get your contacts, calendars, mail and task lists synchronized over-the-air... and the latest versions support a push model for this synchronization. It supports security policies for handsets including remote-wipe capability for lost/stolen devices and/or terminated employees.

Of course Apple is doing a lot right with the iPhone but they should know that it isn't going to be enough to merely meet analyst expectations at this point. They need to go above and beyond in order to blow away sales targets in order to please the street.

Yes, yes, I'd like it if they fixed the shortcomings so I could get one for myself but I'm just thinking about my dad and the beating his retirement portfolio is taking because Steve's losing his ability to keep up with investor fantasies.

Mighty Mouse – January 23, 2008 09:02AM Reply Quote
I don't think meeting analysts expectations is the problem here. Given how Apple seems to always exceed Wall Street expectations on units shipped, revenue, etc. (except on guidance for next quarter), seems the street doesn't do a good job of predicting what customers want.

Steve has *never* tried to keep up with investor fantasies. That said, the ONLY thing that would have kept the stock from tanking yesterday was Apple guiding for a stronger quarter than Wall Street expects for *next* quarter, which Apple rarely does. It's not about how many units that WERE sold, it's how many are you GOING to sell. Apple could have sold 10 million Macs, 1 billion iPods, and 8 million iPhones last quarter and the stock would have STILL tanked because of their "soft" guidance. Put another way, if the iPhone had exchange support, voice-dialing, and every thing else missing that people wanted and sold ridiculous amounts of product last quarter, it still wouldn't have mattered yesterday.

As soon as this panic resides, Apple will recover. Question is, when does the panic reside? Probably not for a while. I'm pissed, too, CS, but not at Apple. I'm pissed at the knee-jerk reactions and lack of rationale on the street.

Mokers (Moderator) – January 23, 2008 10:01AM Reply Quote
Formerly Remy Martin
Quote
Cloudscout
I don't understand what you mean by the last two sentences.

If you have an Exchange server, you don't need to involve RIM at all. OWA on the iPhone is... not good.

Ummm, no. If you do not have the Blackberry enterprise server, you need to use special desktop software to enable you connect to you plan on connecting using POP.

http://www.verizonwireless.com/b2c/splash/blackberry.jsp#bdr

This is a problem that people are having now. If you need to connect to your corporate e-mail using POP, there is no reason not to use an iPhone.

Cloudscout – January 23, 2008 10:41AM Reply Quote
Det finnes ikke dårlig vær, bare dårlige klær!
That's only if you want to use a Blackberry device.

If you have a Windows Mobile device or a PalmOS device or a Symbian device you don't need that middleware. They sync directly with the Exchange server.

bahamut – January 23, 2008 11:09AM Reply Quote
I wouldn't say that. I just talked to a friend who was upgrading from Blackberry to iPhone. i warned him about the typing, he said, he had had it.

Mokers (Moderator) – January 23, 2008 11:35AM Reply Quote
Formerly Remy Martin
Quote
Cloudscout
That's only if you want to use a Blackberry device.

If you have a Windows Mobile device or a PalmOS device or a Symbian device you don't need that middleware. They sync directly with the Exchange server.

Yes, but RIM doesn't have outlook support out of the box, and they are the number one smartphone provider in the country. Apple doesn't need Outlook out of the box to be successful. They would get a lot more customers, but losing those potential customers doesn't make it a dud.

http://www.businessweek.com/technology/content/jan2008/tc20080122_786382.htm?chan=top+news_top+news+index_businessweek+exclusives

Cloudscout – January 23, 2008 11:47AM Reply Quote
Det finnes ikke dårlig vær, bare dårlige klær!
RIM's solution came first. It wasn't until about 18 months ago that Microsoft provided a push solution and security policies for EAS directly. By then, RIM was already firmly established in many organizations.

stan adams – January 23, 2008 11:54AM Reply Quote
I'm with Mighty Mouse on this -- TSO is running Apple and not allowing "the street" to alter his vision.

CS is absolutely correct about all the wonderful things that RIM & Windows Mobile offer to enterprise messaging platforms. TSO does not need to have "feature parity" with those offerings now, possibly ever.

Once the iPhone SDK is released is API is it likely to include "remote wipe" "remote Domain Group Policy Object manipulation" "bi-directional OTA sync" and all sorts of ultra geeky stuff that 90% of users will never need? I dunno. Maybe yes, and maybe no. If yes it will certainly pit MSFT and RIM squarely as "competitors" which is probably not so good, as right now I would guess that fully 75% of blackberry users have iPods. If no then SJ is going to let Android do for Google what the Schmidtster led Java did for Sun...

Stock prices bounce all over the place all the time. Generally has very little to do with any short term action that the company independently undertook. When I worked for IBM every friggin morning your locked in browser home page would have the bad news/good news staring at us. Really motivating. Not.

My guess is that Apple will "out perform" tech sector and the Total Market by a good 4-5% or more through 2008. No reason to think otherwise.

Madaracs – January 23, 2008 11:54AM Reply Quote
Ooh! Scary! Scary! Don't we look mean? You can't see me! But I can see you!
Don't use RIM, came first and firmly all in the same sentence--you'll make me hot!
--
The only reason I don't have an iPhone is because it doesn't support RIM.

stan adams – January 23, 2008 12:15PM Reply Quote
Madracs --

While I understand your position, I think it is also shorthand for "If my work email & calendar was currently supporting the use of iPhone I'd probably spend my own money on a device instead of relying on the shiny RIM or WinMobile device for which my employer currently picks up the tab". I don't doubt that you'd shell out for it, but what about you co-workers? Would they be equally self supporting? Or if the messaging infrastructure folks at your employer DID have a solution that made your personal iPhone as manageable/secure as currently blackberrys and WinMobile devices would they still be "signing on" to an expanded role for the "help desk" as well as all the whiners that would want a shiny new iPhone paid for out of company coffers?

Just saying I think SJ knows that even "simplification" can be a hard sell against entrenched solutions...

Madaracs – January 23, 2008 03:33PM Reply Quote
Ooh! Scary! Scary! Don't we look mean? You can't see me! But I can see you!
Quote
stan adams
"If my work email & calendar was currently supporting the use of iPhone I'd probably spend my own money on a device instead of relying on the shiny RIM or WinMobile device for which my employer currently picks up the tab".

That is not entirely inaccurate. ;-)

My position is basically the above. I used to carry two phones--but that's just silly--'specially when your employer says you need to have a blackberry so we'll pay for it. The only thing that I'd add is that I don't care if my employer buys my phone--I'd shell out for a nice one. 2 out of 5 in my group carry 2 cell phones--and they own RAZRs because they're cheap and they look cool. The iPhone has so much fun stuff to offer as well as another iPod for me... so I would be very interested in it as a regular phone for me.

rino – January 23, 2008 04:01PM Reply Quote
In America, the only respectable form of socialism is socialism for the rich.
iPhone is a great thing. Yep, I want it to sync with Exchange too, and, I want it to always vibrate but longer and harder ... oh wait.
Seriously, the device is the winner. The Newton of the new century.

---> AAPL
This crash is not unlike the previous crash to 140 only to rise to 200 by turn of year. Frequently AAPL goes on wild rides like this, very volatile stock. Only this time the Nasdaq and other indices have been in free fall too and AAPL always get's trounced like this. RIMM has seen a 26% decline, GOOG 20%... the list goes on.

The company's guidance is still represents outstanding growth.

Also, money managers made a ton of money. The rest of the market started sliding. Some sold some of their overall share in AAPL to take profits and make their funds look decent.

Long term in a normal situation things look great for AAPL but in this economy who knows.

Mighty Mouse – January 23, 2008 04:20PM Reply Quote
I agree with rino.

Today has been better, despite starting at 136 and dropping almost to 125. It closed higher than it opened. I figure it will start inching up again once all the bad news gets out. I thought Moto might drag things down again today, but I guess everyone expects them to suck. M$ is tomorrow.

Cloudscout – January 23, 2008 04:27PM Reply Quote
Det finnes ikke dårlig vær, bare dårlige klær!
I have no doubt that the stock will recover and then some.

I still firmly believe that the eventual release of Exchange sync is going to significantly increase market share for the iPhone, though... and along with it's official announcement, investors will respond favorably.

Think about it for a moment... Apple does not focus on providing solutions of any kind to large businesses. They have their niche markets, but a corporate-friendly iPhone could be their first major foot in the door some places. It could also push them past RIM and toward "ownership" of the smartphone market.

Mighty Mouse – January 23, 2008 04:35PM Reply Quote
http://www.nasdaq.com/aspxcontent/NewsStory.aspx?cpath=20080123/ACQRTT200801231610RTTRADERUSEQUITY_1221.htm

This is misleading crap. First off, stock closed at 139.07 from everything I can see. And while it is "sharply lower" a lot of that happened in after hours trading.

If you look at the performance from open to close today, it's more encouraging.

Shame on nasdaq. With crappy reporting like this, it's no wonder things are like they are.

tliet – January 23, 2008 05:38PM Reply Quote
Why We Need A Crash Now

Quote
forbes.com
In terms of the $150 billion jump-start package, to have an effect it will have to get into the system in places that matter to the disrupted financial chain of events. Clearly, if it ended up in the monolines' capital accounts, it would wind back the damage done to bonds, but that won't happen. If it ends up in people's savings accounts, that wouldn't be much help, while splurging it on more cheap goods from China is hardly likely to do anything at all.

stan adams – January 23, 2008 05:57PM Reply Quote
You have to have RIch Uncle Pennybags reading that. And doing that throat cleared, chest thumping rhump rhump thing:

tliet – January 23, 2008 06:26PM Reply Quote
True, but I'm afraid the rug is being pulled from under the dollar with the interest being lowered like yesterday. Now this may very well be intentional, because the US dollar debt papers the Asians are holding will slowly lose their value, it's just the question for how long they will accept that before converting those investments into something that does hold value.

The low interest is precisely the reason the debt crisis got started, now people are inclined to borrow even more.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 01/23/2008 06:27PM by tliet.

stan adams – January 23, 2008 06:32PM Reply Quote
Quote
tliet
it's just the question for how long they will accept that before converting those investments into something that does hold value.
Comic Books!

Sorry, only registered users may post in this forum.

Click here to login