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Loonie Legislators and that Wacky Webernet Thingo

John Willoughby's Avatar Picture John Willoughby – January 01, 2008 03:13AM Reply Quote
The topic that just keeps on giving.

John Willoughby – April 09, 2010 05:27PM Reply Quote
Cyberdyne Systems Customer Support
Quote
El Jeffe
I don't see any worry about oil demand. It will rise to a price where substitutes will make economic sense, and the 'last barrel' will never be taken out of the ground.

I think the problem that some people foresee is that because we are glossing over the problem, and not truly altering our practices, there will be a moment of realization... some fire in an oilfield, or a war that blocks some substantial oil supplier... and there will be no supplier with the reserve capacity to take up the slack. Suddenly, oil will be seen as scarce, and then human psychology will kick in. Futures will frantically get bid up to insane levels, street prices will skyrocket and even if/when the initial situation is remedied, we have hit a period where folks can't drive their cars or heat their homes. When trucks can't get food where it is needed, and people can't get where they need to go, enormous consequences can be anticipated.

So, we're not just facing a pure economic supply/demand curve but also human behavior in an environment of perceived scarcity.

El Jeffe – April 09, 2010 06:16PM Reply Quote
What a journey.
I think we could cut our consumption plenty tomorrow, on a moment's notice, if there was an emergency and everyone telecommuted. Why hasn't that been mandated by green-conscious government/munis yet? What percentage of cars on the road are people that are driving to sit in front of a computer? Why can't those work from home immediately?

same with schools. Why can't many of these lectures be mandated to be tele-lectured? Now with mommy and daddy working from home, kiddies can't tele-learn up through college. Go in one day every two weeks for a test, or give them a web-timed-test to take in front of a webcam or such to monitor cheating.

just some thoughts. I could, and did most of last year, work from home almost 100% at a moment's notice. My coworker, in Wisconsin does. He moved away last year and never really comes in at all.

tliet – April 09, 2010 11:41PM Reply Quote
[replying to Daniel's post a few posts back, I seem to miss posts sometimes because they are on a next page]

Media traditionally has been all about fact checking, keeping sources anonymous if they wanted to be and huge walls between the copy room and the advertising department. All in the interest of the reader, to keep him or her informed in a way that can be trusted to be fact based and while being completely unbiased is impossible, at least insights from multiple sides of the isle. That's the way I see it, right?

That story you linked to seems to trample all over the spirit of these rules, while not specifically laid out. I think no one in their right mind can trust that site anymore to comment on stories. Sure the judge was way out of line, but that wasn't the point of divulging the personal identifiable information. It looks to me like the reporter had a problem with the name calling of the commenter and decided to figure out who hid behind the e-mail address. Only when he found out this judge could be connected to that e-mail address it was reported. Now that's integrity!

If a site has got forums that can be accessed anonymously, a user should be reasonably able to expect to remain anonymous. I realise that it's harder and harder these days. We just had an incident in which the attorney general requested the IP addresses of ALL commenters on a story in a local newspaper on fights between two ethnic groups. Not the ones that we inflammatory. No, all IP addresses. Asked about it, the minister of Justice says that it's just normal procedure. The paper obviously declined and is prepared to fight all the way to the European court for human rights, but it shows the contempt certain individuals have for the right to privacy and the lack of insight to the implications of these type of incidents.

I have the same problem with the content monitoring on the App Store. Sure you can monitor for malware and other crap. But once you moderate one application for its content, you open a can of worms that is just to big to oversee all the implications. I mean it when I say that I want to see all religious apps removed from the App Store as I have a huge problem with religion, I'm very easily offended by it. Now why should my opinion not be listened to, when it's apparently normal to remove all material that hows humans in their true form?



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 04/09/2010 11:43PM by tliet.

John Willoughby – April 21, 2010 03:56PM Reply Quote
Cyberdyne Systems Customer Support

tliet – April 22, 2010 02:03AM Reply Quote
The only thing that helps is to completely stop giving money to these organisations, starve the beast if you will.

YDD – April 22, 2010 08:57AM Reply Quote
Quote

The only thing that helps is to completely stop giving money to these organisations, starve the beast if you will.
I suspect you will find that people who aren't buying music are, ipso facto, automatically categorised as pirates.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 04/22/2010 08:58AM by YDD.

stan adams – April 22, 2010 04:28PM Reply Quote
Quote
El Jeffe
I think we could cut our consumption plenty tomorrow, on a moment's notice, if there was an emergency and everyone telecommuted. Why hasn't that been mandated by green-conscious government/munis yet? What percentage of cars on the road are people that are driving to sit in front of a computer? Why can't those work from home immediately?

same with schools. Why can't many of these lectures be mandated to be tele-lectured? Now with mommy and daddy working from home, kiddies can't tele-learn up through college. Go in one day every two weeks for a test, or give them a web-timed-test to take in front of a webcam or such to monitor cheating.

just some thoughts. I could, and did most of last year, work from home almost 100% at a moment's notice. My coworker, in Wisconsin does. He moved away last year and never really comes in at all.


I was thinking about this as I was sitting in the HORRENDOUS traffic tie-ups caused by the dunderheaded decision to have multiple re-paving projects effecting parallel roadways that are part of my normal commute. The poor scheduling is an obvious and insulting attempt to make employment numbers look better. Of course if there was truly any concern about fuel economy the hundreds of thousands of engines running far below their peak efficiency should have been considered. The work could have simply been better coordinated or the contract specify that the work be done at times other than peak rush hour. Or even a strong direction from the sizable government work force in the region to mandate "work from home" that would be echoed by private sector employers.

True colors show through...

El Jeffe – April 22, 2010 05:37PM Reply Quote
What a journey.
now that the MAGICAL iPads are here...

Well, if I remember my School House Rock, all it takes is someone to start a petition, and make a bill that gets passed into law. So, I'll get right on forcing government computer jobs to be from home.

stan adams – April 23, 2010 10:12AM Reply Quote
I am sorta serious about that Bill -- I mean seriously if the harm from CO2 emissions are to be taken seriously I do believe that at least "an executive order" or similar memo directing all agencies to ensure the maximum number of saved trips are not hindered by rules that make it overly restrictive to work from home.
The real result of that could be hugely beneficial.

El Jeffe – April 23, 2010 06:33PM Reply Quote
What a journey.
I believe you are serious.

Today I heard some study of the grounded flights in UK/Europe ----> Caused the temperatures to rise 1 point some degree.

Also, someone needs to scan if any overlap of the scientist who did the chicken little screams for the ash also work on the climate changes. Their models failed to model something much more real, tangible than guessing eons of temperature data and trends, let alone causes and fixes.

ARL (Moderator) – April 23, 2010 07:25PM Reply Quote
Did you see the insides of one of the jet engines that flew through that ash? Nasty...

Safety first frankly. I'd rather that than 747s falling out of the sky...

ARL (Moderator) – April 24, 2010 01:43AM Reply Quote
On a tangent, it's really embarrassing when you get a lecture from the US about internet censorship - this gist of which is "dude, you don't need a filter, it doesn't work anyway, let the web be free".

I feel like I'm living in China.

John Willoughby – April 24, 2010 12:06PM Reply Quote
Cyberdyne Systems Customer Support
Report to Brisbane Re-education and Reorientation Camp #53 at 09:00 tomorrow, Citizen.

ARL (Moderator) – April 25, 2010 02:49AM Reply Quote
That would be the comrade Conroy citizenship camp, no?

tliet – April 25, 2010 11:08AM Reply Quote

ARL (Moderator) – April 25, 2010 08:09PM Reply Quote
That's brilliant, tliet!

ARL (Moderator) – May 20, 2010 01:38AM Reply Quote
DPBD!

Don't bring any dirty mags or have any pr0n on your iPhone if you're travelling downunder...

(in fact better not have any photos where all parties aren't fully clothed...)

El Jeffe – May 20, 2010 07:09AM Reply Quote
What a journey.

ddt – May 20, 2010 09:42AM Reply Quote
hm, thanks for that heads-up, bill. i'm asking around and will update w/ what I learn.

in other news, be careful w/ your copy machine: http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9176928/FTC_targets_privacy_concerns_related_to_copy_machines

ddt

tliet – May 20, 2010 12:36PM Reply Quote
Tony, has the government completely lost the plot down under? It's unfortunate, since I would have liked to visit Australia once, but for now I'll shelve those plans indefinitely until someone sane rolls back this insanity.

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