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Apple's relationship with the press, customers, and dealers

tliet's Avatar Picture tliet – March 20, 2008 05:34AM Reply Quote
Although we don't live in the Apple is beleaguered times anymore, there's still enough to be said about them...
Transplanted once again...

The Gay Blade - 05:54pm Mar 31, 2000 EST
The Blade will attempt to transplant yet another rhetorical sapling here
on the Spork boards by copping a page from the delightful Brian Miller,
writing eloquently on the superannuated boards of yesteryear:

Brian Miller - 03:07pm Sep 30, 1999 PT
The man with a plan

My recent PowerBook G3 fiasco notwithstanding, I am beginning to wonder if
Apple is planning on abandoning "small fry customers." Consider the
evidence:



1) Apple's war with the Macintosh press;
2) Apple's slashing and burning of small local dealers, who often provided
the best service "in a pinch";
3) Apple's continued horrendous customer service breaches (individual Apple
Store orders cancelled in favour of large educaction/business orders).

Pulling all this evidence together and analysing it makes me feel far more
"worried" about Apple's future than any time under Amelio. Consider, for
instance, what all of those resources spent on lawyers threatening tiny Mac
sites could do in customer service and relations.



Before we consider Apple's "invasion" into the Fortune 1000 enterprise to
be ready, we have to focus on Apple's status in its own current markets. In
my view, there's a lot of "retrenching" to do before they're ready. They
can start by ceasing their intimidation of Mac publishers, letting the damn
Mac rags publish OS 8.6 on their cover disks, and spending a bit more time,
effort, and energy on a "satisfy the customer at all costs throughout the
organisation" policy. These are all core competencies they'll need before
they can even THINK of invading the big-enterprise space.
[/quote]

ARL (Moderator) – February 01, 2010 01:10PM Reply Quote
I whinge therefore I am!
I agree. The proof of the pudding would be if Adobe really made an effort to stamp out the bugs and Apple still locked out flash.

dharlow – February 01, 2010 02:06PM Reply Quote
I don't know if Adobe could stamp out all the problems, part of it is with bad Flash programmers and their use of Actionscript.

Also is anyone in fear of what the new Flash->iPhone Apps will do to the quality of applications on the App store once anyone with a little Flash experience can publish an App to the store?

Daniel

ARL (Moderator) – February 01, 2010 02:27PM Reply Quote
I whinge therefore I am!
Flash is the new VisualBasic?

Jobs was going on about HTML5 "replacing" Flash. Aside from a few boffins at the W3C - is anyone even bothering with that?

John Willoughby – February 01, 2010 03:23PM Reply Quote
Save us, Lord, from the furries of the Norsemen!

Cloudscout – February 01, 2010 05:29PM Reply Quote
Det finnes ikke dårlig vær, bare dårlige klær!
They need to get that full-screen limitation fixed, though.

stan adams – February 01, 2010 05:53PM Reply Quote
I think Apple likes Adobe, the same way a kindly pimp likes his best whore. If that whore should try and do a little side business that kindly pimp will come back with a good bitch slap or worse...

HTML5 and dedicated open source codec(s) WILL eventually rule video-dom.

If Apple cared to it could buy Adobe (all cash, and still have a mountain of dough left over to fight the inevitable DOJ monopoly suit), but that would be like the pimp adopting all the whores illegitamate kids so no other baby dadies were technically on the hook for support payments. Not sure why the Mac-daddy would really wanna go down that road...



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 02/01/2010 05:54PM by stan adams.

Dr Phred (Moderator) – February 05, 2010 03:28PM Reply Quote
owned by the mothership.
But, in the mean time, the lack of flash is a major drawback. Especially for a media playback device. No hulu? No thanks.

ARL (Moderator) – February 05, 2010 03:42PM Reply Quote
I whinge therefore I am!
Quote
stan adams
I think Apple likes Adobe, the same way a kindly pimp likes his best whore. If that whore should try and do a little side business that kindly pimp will come back with a good bitch slap or worse...

HTML5 and dedicated open source codec(s) WILL eventually rule video-dom.

If Apple cared to it could buy Adobe (all cash, and still have a mountain of dough left over to fight the inevitable DOJ monopoly suit), but that would be like the pimp adopting all the whores illegitamate kids so no other baby dadies were technically on the hook for support payments. Not sure why the Mac-daddy would really wanna go down that road...

Metaphor of the day award goes to Stan Adams...

johnny k – February 06, 2010 04:44AM Reply Quote
Quote
dharlow
Also is anyone in fear of what the new Flash->iPhone Apps will do to the quality of applications on the App store once anyone with a little Flash experience can publish an App to the store?

I can see iPhone users, like Mac users of yore, developing a sensitivity to what a "proper" app feels like. This relegates Flash to games, which may be great for the app selection, or runs down battery life... but even the game experience may not be optimal if they can't do multitouch, so maybe Flash is altogether avoided.

In any case, would it be any worse in its own way than the apps of questionable taste? If Flash wants to be a alternative to XCode/ObjC, great. We need more of those. We need the Hypercard of iPhone, don't we? TileStack is close, but Apple needs to just allow people to put apps that they wrote on their own device.

John Willoughby – February 06, 2010 05:55AM Reply Quote
Save us, Lord, from the furries of the Norsemen!
Well, get a developer's account and you can. It's distributing to other people that subjects you to the app store. Actually, they even have a way to let you distribute apps within a company, don't they? It's been too long since I signed up, and I don't remember.

Simon – February 10, 2010 11:14PM Reply Quote
But, in the mean time, the lack of flash is a major drawback. Especially for a media playback device. No hulu? No thanks.

Hulu isn't licensed to stream to mobile devices so its a moot point.

Simon – February 10, 2010 11:17PM Reply Quote
Can't find much info on the enterprise program other than this:
Enterprise Program $299

For companies with 500 or more employees who are creating proprietary in-house applications for iPhone and iPod touch.

ARL (Moderator) – May 12, 2010 11:52PM Reply Quote
I whinge therefore I am!
Can't believe this was missed:

Steve Jobs' thoughts on Flash...

bahamut – May 13, 2010 07:56AM Reply Quote
Oops. http://www.engadget.com/2010/05/13/adobe-targets-apple-in-ad-campaign-launched-today-publishes-ope/

I think public opinion is going to start turning against Apple soon. It's not going to go well for them in the long run if they keep this up. They think people actually love them, when nobody does. It's happened before so many times. People will leave in a minute if there are better experiences elsewhere and the walled garden is going to rub up against what people want to do too much.

porruka (Admin) – May 13, 2010 08:06AM Reply Quote
Failure is pre-greatness.
The thing that Apple has always been good at is (on the whole) giving people what they need and actually want, as opposed to what they say they want.

Consumers and many technical users don't give a shit about how much code is custom and how much os cross platform. What they care about is the feature set and the capabilities their tools provide.

No matter how many devs whine about having to make custom code, the only way Apple will fail at this is if devs stop making code for Apple products. With the marketshare and market opportunity that the iDevices give now, one drops out, another will fill in.

Even the venerable Mac OS is still seeing surging in sales and popularity, so companies drop support for that at their own peril these days.

Jobs is right and the Mac OS is an example. Let the devs be lazy and they will. Witness the landscape strewn with crappy ports and feature-incomplete Mac versions.

I don't believe flash is evil for everything, but I'll be glad to see it go. I've felt that way for several years.

John Willoughby – May 13, 2010 08:09AM Reply Quote
Save us, Lord, from the furries of the Norsemen!
I think that Adobe is overplaying their hand as well. Nobody who isn't a content provider loves Flash, and it is common enough that most of us have had some pretty strong negative experiences with it.

stan adams – May 13, 2010 09:25AM Reply Quote
Call me forgetfull but I never recall seeing IBM run ads about MSFT was somehow "taking away freedom" by inducing OEM licenses that effectively shut OS/2 out of the market...

It might be interesting to see what would happen if Google put some Flash dev tools togther http://community.tasteofhome.com/forums/t/726658.aspx

Heck I would like to know how Warnock and Geschke feel about these guys: http://www.activeswf.com/

bahamut – May 13, 2010 12:31PM Reply Quote
I don't get it. The Mac OS is completely different. Now I don't particularly care about Flash but Joan and Ruth may care about hulu or about not being able to do obvious stuff on the iPad. When something better comes along, Apple should be prepared to sink like a stone. Mark those words.

porruka (Admin) – May 13, 2010 12:46PM Reply Quote
Failure is pre-greatness.
Baha,

IMO the Mac OS example is where the iDevices would be without *some* form of "do the right thing or don't do it at all" sort of structure.

You're right about "I want Hulu" for example, but that's ok: Hulu is working on an iPad app. They know the same thing, they have to get their content where the eyeballs are. The pattern so far is that the most in-demand services are going to be in iPad/iPod/iPhone in some fashion, despite any current dependency on Flash.

Android devices have the potential to upset the applecart (so to speak) and competition is good, but the results aren't there yet.

I used to work on a product that let developers write the same code for multiple platforms, that tried to do the right thing: for platforms that didn't support certain functionality, it was faked/re-implemented as best as possible. That is not (and was not) sustainable). The only sustainable model for xplat toolkits/environments is LCD, and that will kill Apple and iDevices a helluva lot faster than any accusations of "walled gardens" because if you can get the same crapware on any device, why get Apple's? And where do AAPL's profits come from? The hardware. Why can Apple command a non-trivial profit margin on the hardware? Because of the overall experience.

bahamut – May 13, 2010 01:47PM Reply Quote
Today Hulu just slammed HTML5 as not being ready for the purposes. We'll see how they do as far as iPad apps go, the context of that is clear.

The thing is that the user experience of Apple's iBooks is so low (inferior to kindle) that we might as well go with LCD books and magazines. The demos of Wired via Flash are in an entirely different league than iBooks.

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