Spork Boards

Apple's relationship with the press, customers, and dealers

tliet's Avatar Picture tliet – March 20, 2008 05:34AM Reply Quote
Although we don't live in the Apple is beleaguered times anymore, there's still enough to be said about them...
Transplanted once again...

The Gay Blade - 05:54pm Mar 31, 2000 EST
The Blade will attempt to transplant yet another rhetorical sapling here
on the Spork boards by copping a page from the delightful Brian Miller,
writing eloquently on the superannuated boards of yesteryear:

Brian Miller - 03:07pm Sep 30, 1999 PT
The man with a plan

My recent PowerBook G3 fiasco notwithstanding, I am beginning to wonder if
Apple is planning on abandoning "small fry customers." Consider the
evidence:



1) Apple's war with the Macintosh press;
2) Apple's slashing and burning of small local dealers, who often provided
the best service "in a pinch";
3) Apple's continued horrendous customer service breaches (individual Apple
Store orders cancelled in favour of large educaction/business orders).

Pulling all this evidence together and analysing it makes me feel far more
"worried" about Apple's future than any time under Amelio. Consider, for
instance, what all of those resources spent on lawyers threatening tiny Mac
sites could do in customer service and relations.



Before we consider Apple's "invasion" into the Fortune 1000 enterprise to
be ready, we have to focus on Apple's status in its own current markets. In
my view, there's a lot of "retrenching" to do before they're ready. They
can start by ceasing their intimidation of Mac publishers, letting the damn
Mac rags publish OS 8.6 on their cover disks, and spending a bit more time,
effort, and energy on a "satisfy the customer at all costs throughout the
organisation" policy. These are all core competencies they'll need before
they can even THINK of invading the big-enterprise space.
[/quote]

El Jeffe – November 12, 2015 12:02AM Reply Quote
What a journey.
I sure hope there is more to this story than what I see at face value.

ARL (Moderator) – February 06, 2016 12:48AM Reply Quote
I whinge therefore I am!
Wow.

Left unresolved, this could be as bad as the iTunes 2.0 fiasco...

tomierna (Admin) – February 06, 2016 10:38AM Reply Quote
Hideously Unnatural
Error 53 is being blown out of proportion, especially considering why it's happening.

If iOS senses non-paired button parts on a fingerprint-scanning enabled phone, should it continue to work - potentially exposing your private fingerprint data to a malicious device?

The third-party repair services should stop trying to repair TouchID buttons. It's my understanding that even Apple doesn't repair them - they swap out the phone, since the buttons are paired to the main board at the factory.

John Willoughby – February 06, 2016 10:44AM Reply Quote
Save us, Lord, from the furries of the Norsemen!
I'm in favor of the current behavior. I can get my data back; I don't want anybody else to have easier access to the phone.

El Jeffe – February 06, 2016 12:57PM Reply Quote
What a journey.
Quote
tomierna
Error 53 is being blown out of proportion, especially considering why it's happening.

If iOS senses non-paired button parts on a fingerprint-scanning enabled phone, should it continue to work - potentially exposing your private fingerprint data to a malicious device?

The third-party repair services should stop trying to repair TouchID buttons. It's my understanding that even Apple doesn't repair them - they swap out the phone, since the buttons are paired to the main board at the factory.

Agreed.
I took apart iPod Touch and the button on those were a PITA!

ARL (Moderator) – February 06, 2016 01:40PM Reply Quote
I whinge therefore I am!
Oh, I thought it meant you couldn't get your data back.

Mokers (Moderator) – February 16, 2016 07:42AM Reply Quote
Formerly Remy Martin
Forgot if there was an apple store thread. In any case, had a good experience fixing my phone yesterday. Although it was 1 day out of apple care, they comped the replacement of the front display (earpiece and main microphone weren't working properly). It took about 45 minutes longer than they quoted, but that didn't bother me so much. That being said, they have the absolute worst seating imaginable.

John Willoughby – February 16, 2016 01:44PM Reply Quote
Save us, Lord, from the furries of the Norsemen!
Quote
Mokers
That being said, they have the absolute worst seating imaginable.

I think that they're trying to convince people not to linger.

ARL (Moderator) – February 17, 2016 01:06AM Reply Quote
I whinge therefore I am!

El Jeffe – February 17, 2016 01:53PM Reply Quote
What a journey.
Wow is one word.
Apple and Cook will fail.

ARL (Moderator) – February 17, 2016 05:15PM Reply Quote
I whinge therefore I am!
Well, Cook at least has the support of the left (or as it would be called in the US, the radical extreme far-left).

Quote
Senator Scott Ludlum

Encryption technology is used by millions of people every day to manage financial transactions, to protect against identity theft and to keep their medical and other personal information safe, and developers of the technology should not be bullied by governments into making those protections weaker, the Australian Greens said today.

"The US FBI's demand that Apple build a 'back door' into the iPhone is extraordinarily reckless. There are millions of iOS devices in use in Australia. This proposal would put every single one of those users at risk of identity theft," Australian Greens Communications spokesperson Senator Scott Ludlam said today.

"The Attorney-General's department recently estimated that identity theft costs Australia $1.6 billion every year, and that number is growing. Forcing providers to weaken encryption is effectively an identity theft stimulus package.

"We're already enduring the expensive, intrusive and ineffective metadata retention scheme in the name of the 'war on terror'. Using the tragedies of terror attacks for a blatant power grab is an absolute disgrace, and it will have no tangible impact, and huge consequences.

"We strongly urge Attorney-General George Brandis to help keep millions of Australian smartphone users safe, and write to his US counterparts to urge them to reconsider the request to break a technology we all depend on," Senator Ludlam said.

ddt – February 17, 2016 08:02PM Reply Quote
You missed the EFF and ACLU, too?

ddt

ARL (Moderator) – February 18, 2016 12:12AM Reply Quote
I whinge therefore I am!
Even Google has come out in support of them.

Temporarily not being evil.

John Willoughby – February 18, 2016 06:59AM Reply Quote
Save us, Lord, from the furries of the Norsemen!
The government's evil endangers their evil.

ddt – February 18, 2016 07:10AM Reply Quote
Best comments on Slashdot was this follow-up:

"Google and privacy aren't really acquainted."
"But Google reads privacy's emails."

ddt

James DeBenedetti – February 18, 2016 08:02AM Reply Quote
Quote
ARL
Even Google has come out in support of them.

Really?

Read their statements with the understanding they will turn over data to the FBI/NSA/etc. whenever asked - have they actually committed to anything on this subject?

johnny k – February 18, 2016 11:37AM Reply Quote
Yeah, that was as cowardly as possible, like Glenn Beck "just asking questions." I would've respected him more for taking a stance and backing it up with an argument. There were coded messages in his wording.

ARL (Moderator) – February 18, 2016 01:14PM Reply Quote
I whinge therefore I am!
I really need to stop skimming articles and taking the headline as gospel

Money quote:

Quote
Googlevil
While Pichai echoed Cook's comments, he didn't say that Google would refuse to build similar tools for devices that work on its Android mobile software. Android runs on about 80 per cent of the world's smartphones, while Apple has a market share of about 19 per cent, according to IDC. Pichai closed his five-tweet message by saying that he's "looking forward to a thoughtful and open discussion on this important issue."

Still, Pichai is making clear that Google, part of the Alphabet, is "a lot more on the side of Apple than he is on the government's," said Jeremiah Grossman, founder of WhiteHat Security. "No one wants to be put into the situation of hacking their own devices."

So yes, still evil.

El Jeffe – February 18, 2016 03:05PM Reply Quote
What a journey.
Should Apple move?
Just move the HQ/operations to avoid this mess.
Seems impossible, ludicrous, ... but man would that make a statement.

johnny k – February 18, 2016 04:08PM Reply Quote
They are building a spaceship.

Sorry, only registered users may post in this forum.

Click here to login